Sixth Amendment right to counsel

  1. bestmilitarydefensedefenseattorneys9.55.27PMcopyMil. R. Evid. 305(e)(2); 305(g)(2)(C).
  2. McNeil v. Wisconsin
    , 501 U.S. 171 (1991). Sixth Amendment right to counsel is offense specific. Therefore, police may approach a suspect, who has counsel for a charged offense, about a different uncharged offense. Invocation of the Fifth Amendment right to counsel cannot be inferred from the invocation of the Sixth Amendment right in light of the differing purposes and effects of the two rights.
  3. United States v. Sager
    , 36 M.J. 137 (C.M.A. 1992). Representation by civilian counsel on child sex abuse charges pending in civilian court did not constitute invocation of right to counsel with respect to later questioning by CID concerning unrelated child sex abuse offenses on a military installation.
  4. United States v. Kendig
    , 36 M.J. 291 (C.M.A. 1993). Court held that exercising option to consult counsel during Article 15 proceeding: 1) did not constitute invoking Fifth Amendment right to counsel; 2) did not create a Sixth Amendment right to counsel; and, 3) did not require notice to counsel under Mil. R. Evid. 305(e) since subsequent interview concerned unrelated offenses.
  5. United States v. Hanes
    , 34 M.J. 1168 (N.M.C.M.R. 1992). “[A] request for counsel at an RCM 305(i) hearing before charges have been preferred neither invokes a Sixth Amendment right to counsel because the hearing is not an adversarial proceeding nor invokes a Fifth Amendment right to counsel because the hearing is not the functional equivalent of a custodial interrogation.”

Fifth Amendment right to counsel

United States v. Hanes