Filing a writ

Overview of process for filing a writ:
filing a writ

  1. Preliminary Considerations.
    a. Does the case qualify?
    1) Jurisdiction.
    2) Relief sought.
    3) Extraordinary Circumstance.
    b. Must the military judge grant a continuance?
    1) Discretion of the military judge (R.C.M. 906(b)(1)).
    2) No automatic stay; but once a stay is issued by CCA or CAAF, proceedings stop.                                                                                                                  c. Which forum?                                                                                                                                          1) There is a preference for initial consideration by a CCA.See ABC, Inc. v. Powell, 47 M.J. 363 (1997); United States v. Redding , 11 M.J. 100 (C.M.A. 1981) (opinion of Cook, J.);
    See also R.C.M. 1204(a), Discussion (C.M.R. filing favored for judicial economy).                     2) CAAF, Rules of Practice and procedure, Rule 4(b)(1): The Court may, in its discretion, entertain original petitions for extraordinary relief . . .. Absent good cause, no such petition shall be filed unless relief has first been sought in the appropriate Court of Criminal Appeals. Original writs are rarely granted.                                                                                                             d. Considerations of time and subject matter.
  2. Special rule for trial counsel. Before filing an application for extraordinary relief on behalf of the government, government representatives should (will) coordinate with Appellate Government.