ANNAPOLIS, Md. — A U.S. Naval Academy midshipman has pleaded guilty to using and distributing illegal drugs to fellow midshipmen at the academy, a school spokesman said Friday.

Zachary Williams has been sentenced to 13 months confinement and dismissal from the Navy, said Cmdr. David McKinney, the academy’s spokesman.

Williams, of Canal Fulton, Ohio, pleaded guilty at the Washington Navy Yard on Thursday to introduction of a controlled substance on a military installation and distribution of a controlled substance. He also pleaded guilty to failure to obey a general regulation, possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance and use of a controlled substance.

The charges were based on an investigation by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service that began in November 2017, after midshipmen brought the drug use to the attention of school officials. Some of the charges related to Williams’ arrest by the Dover Police Department in Delaware for selling and possessing controlled substances at a music festival in June.

As a result of the investigation, six midshipmen were kicked out of the academy for using illegal substances, and five were disciplined for other policy violations. The guilty plea from Williams concludes the case, McKinney said.

“The U.S. Navy and the Naval Academy both have a zero tolerance policy towards the wrongful use of controlled substances,” McKinney said.

The case prompted the academy to conduct a full review and make changes to urinalysis drug testing. Every midshipman will be tested randomly at least three times a year.

Prosecutors said Williams obtained drugs on the dark web, where people search for drugs through secret web browsers and buy them using encrypted channels, code names and virtual currencies. Some of the drugs named in the case included cocaine, ecstasy, mushrooms and ketamine, which is an animal tranquilizer that can cause hallucinations.

Lawmakers Demand Answers From Mattis Over Cockroach-Infested Marine Housing

NEWSThis Nov. 13, 2013 file photo shows the main gate of Camp Pendleton Marine Base at Camp Pendleton, Calif.Associated Press/Lenny Ignelzi

Marine Sergeant Major-Select Arrested, Charged With 2 Felonies

By MATTHEW COX, MILITARY.COM on November 29, 2018T&P ON FACEBOOK 

Editor’s Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A U.S. Marine selected for promotion to sergeant major was arrested recently in California and charged with two felonies, one of which involved a deadly weapon.

Police from the Temecula area of California arrested Marine Corps Sgt. Maj.-select Jeremy Wayne King on Nov. 17 and charged him with one count of assault with a deadly weapon and one count of “terrorist threats,” a spokeswoman from Cois Byrd Detention Center told Military.com.

King, who is assigned to the Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, had a court appearance Nov. 21 and was released on bail, the spokeswoman said, but would not release further details about the incident.

He is scheduled to appear in court Dec. 7.

Military.com reached out to the Marine Corps for comment on the story but did not receive a response by press time.

The Corps recently put out a service-wide message to ensure that commanders report “criminal justice information” to the FBI on Marines prohibited from owning personal firearms.

The Nov. 12 Marine administrative message cites the November 2017 mass shooting in a Texas church, saying it could have been prevented if Air Force officials had reported former airman Devin Patrick Kelly’s 2012 conviction for beating his wife and infant stepson to the FBI as required.

Marine officials said in the message that the Gun Control Act prohibits possession of a firearm or ammunition by a person who has been subject to command disciplinary proceedings or has been convicted at a special or general court-martial or in a civilian court of a crime of domestic violence.

King, who is assigned to the Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, had a court appearance Nov. 21 and was released on bail, the spokeswoman said, but would not release further details about the incident.

He is scheduled to appear in court Dec. 7.

Military.com reached out to the Marine Corps for comment on the story but did not receive a response by press time.

The Corps recently put out a service-wide message to ensure that commanders report “criminal justice information” to the FBI on Marines prohibited from owning personal firearms.

The Nov. 12 Marine administrative message cites the November 2017 mass shooting in a Texas church, saying it could have been prevented if Air Force officials had reported former airman Devin Patrick Kelly’s 2012 conviction for beating his wife and infant stepson to the FBI as required.

Marine officials said in the message that the Gun Control Act prohibits possession of a firearm or ammunition by a person who has been subject to command disciplinary proceedings or has been convicted at a special or general court-martial or in a civilian court of a crime of domestic violence.

The Uniform Code of Military Justice is the primary legal code that governs all internal military justice matters.

A Navy officer is facing charges of attempted murder for strangling a woman, according to court records.

“If I can’t have you, nobody will,” the officer told the victim, according to the charge sheet. “I’m going to kill you.”

The name and unit of the accused lieutenant commander were redacted on a copy of the charge sheet provided to Navy Times by Naval Air Forces.

He is scheduled to attend Article 32 hearing on Friday at Naval Base Kitsap in Washington state.

There, a presiding officer will hear the evidence and make a recommendation to higher ups as to whether the case should go to court-martial.

The officer faces two attempted murder charge specifications in connection to a Dec. 20, 2017, incident in St. Johns County, Florida, just down the road from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, according to the charge sheet.

Navy captain charged with steering defense contracts to her own company
Navy captain charged with steering defense contracts to her own company

Capt. Heather Cole is accused of steering more than $600,000 in defense contracts to her own Oklahoma business, according to Navy records.By: Geoff Ziezulewicz

He is accused of attempting to murder a woman — whose name is redacted — “by means of throwing her down on a couch and strangling her with his hands,” the charge sheet states.

On that same day, the officer is accused of “chasing her out of the house and strangling her with his hands.”

Because the victim’s name is redacted on the charge sheet, it is unclear whether the alleged offenses involved a single victim or more than one woman.

That same day in St. Johns County, the charge sheet states the officer threatened a victim.

He also faces a battery charge for repeatedly striking someone in the face that day, as well as a conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman charge.

The officer also faces an obstructing justice charge for trying to make a victim tell an untruthful statement to cast doubt on a police report in May, according to the charge sheet.

While Navy officials declined to identify the accused’s unit, Naval Air Forces assets based in the area include the carriers John C. Stennis and Nimitz, as well as several electronic attack and other squadrons at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island.

A Royal Navy sailor was pinned down by one of his colleagues who tried to make him perform a sex act before laughing it off as ‘banter’, a court heard today.

Able Seaman Troy Griffiths, 26, of Leeds, who is stationed at HMS Raleigh in Cornwall, pinned the man down on his bunk because he ‘thought it was funny’, his colleague claims.

His alleged victim, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was getting ready for bed when Griffiths is accused of restraining him with the help of two others who held one arm each. 

After returning from the showers naked, the sailor put his knees on either side of his chest so he couldn’t move.      

Giving evidence, the sailor said: ‘I told him to f*** off and he just started laughing – he thought it was just banter. 

‘I kept moving my head from side to side and threw my body up and down to try and free my arms.

‘They do stupid pranks all the time, sometimes trying to burn us with Deep Heat, but no one has ever tried to do anything like that.’

The alleged victim tried to punch his attacker away and eventually he got off from on top of him, the court heard. 

The next day Griffiths is alleged to have told his victim he ‘got revenge’.

Confused by what he meant, the man asked what had happened, to which he replied that he had made him perform the sex act on him in his sleep.  

Griffiths denies one charge of sexual assault and two counts of disgraceful conduct. The trial continues.

Griffiths (pictured outside court today) denies one charge of sexual assault and two counts of disgraceful conduct.
Accused: Griffiths is alleged to have made his colleague perform a sex act on him in his sleep

Griffiths (pictured outside court today) denies one charge of sexual assault and two counts of disgraceful conduct

The sailors were stationed at HMS Raleigh in Cornwall (aerial view of base pictured) 

The sailors were stationed at HMS Raleigh in Cornwall (aerial view of base pictured) 

The captured ISIS fighter, whom Gallagher allegedly murdered, was interviewed by an Iraqi journalist moments before the incident (Youtube).

by Stavros Atlamazoglou · November 19, 2018

The charge-sheet describing Chief Special Warfare Operator Edward “Eddie” Gallagher’s actions in Iraq has been leaked, and it is disturbing.

Chief Gallagher has been charged with four different violations of the Uniformed Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). More specifically, Gallagher is accused of murdering a captured fighter by stabbing him in the neck and body; shooting at unarmed civilians; obstructing justice by encouraging his platoon members to remain silent over his actions on three separate occasions; wrongfully using a dead ISIS fighter to reenlist and then operating a drone on the body — details on how he did that remain scant; and finally, abusing banned controlled substances.

Now that the Article 32 hearing has been completed, the officer in charge will consider the evidence. Thereafter, he will decide whether the evidence is substantial enough to justify a court-martial, and present his report to the Naval Special Warfare Group ONE — which has been overseeing the investigation.

Judging from the indictments on the charge-sheet, a court-martial is almost certain. One of Gallagher’s lawyers, Philip Stackhouse, anticipates that there will be a court-martial, but he remains confident that his client will be vindicated.

According to the Navy’s Naval Criminal Investigation Service (NCIS), which has been leading the investigation, the captured fighter that Gallagher allegedly stabbed to death was only 15 years old. The boy had been wounded during a coalition airstrike and then captured by the Iraqi Army during house-clearing operations. The Iraqis handed the wounded to the SEALs for medical treatment. It was during the triage process that Gallagher struck.

C.S., the SEAL medic who was treating the kid, told NCIS investigators that Gallagher “walked up without saying anything at all” and started stabbing the boy. An Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) Chief attached to the SEAL platoon added that he “couldn’t believe what had happened [as] this was just a brainwashed kid.”

According to Special Warfare Operator C.M., Gallagher intimidated members of his platoon by threatening to expose alleged illegal actions. He said that “I have shit on all of you. If you bring this up you all go down.”

Gallagher was arrested in early September and has been confined to the Miramar Brig since then.  A month afterwards, his platoon leader Lt. Jacob “Jake” Portier was charged with covering up Gallagher’s alleged crimes.

A 19-year veteran, Gallagher was assigned to SEAL Team 7, a West-Coast team based in Coronado, California.