The 10-man General Court Martial of the Nigerian Air Force (NAF) Tuesday sentenced Air Craftman Benard Kalu to death by hanging for the killing of his colleague, Corporal Oladipupo, alleged to be his girlfriend.

Kalu had on March 12 this year shot and killed Oladipupo at her Corporal and Below Quarters, Compound 9, Air Force Base, Makurdi on the allegation that she was having an affair with another man.

Kalu, 21, was said to have, after breaking into Oladipupo’s home in the early hours of the fateful Sunday, shot her on the neck at close range, and also attempted to kill the other man whom he had suspected she was having an affair with.

But as fate would have it, his rifle got hooked, giving the other man the opportunity to fight for his life by struggling the rifle with him until he was able to disarm him.

Kalu was later arrested and detained.
Reading out the almost 70-page court findings which lasted for over two hours, the Judge Advocate, Flight Lieutenant MA Umoh, listed the eight-count charge against Kalu to include murder, house breaking, attempted murder, failure to perform military duty, loss of service property, disobedience of service order as well as prejudice of service discipline.

Umoh noted that the accused pleaded not guilty to all the eight-count charge, adding that the prosecution brought 13 witnesses, while three witnesses including the accused were called by the defence counsel.

He maintained further that even though the prosecution found him guilty on all the eight-count charge, the defence, in closing their case, said the prosecution did not prove the case beyond reasonable doubt.

The defence counsel, Abimiku Ewuga, urged the court to temper justice with mercy in their sentence especially as the accused was a first time offender and the bread winner of his family.

Delivering judgment, President of the court, Gp. Capt. Elisha Bindul, who found the accused guilty on six out of the eight-count charge preferred against him, sentenced him to death by hanging subject to the confirmation of the conveying authority.

Ewuga, speaking with journalists after the judgment, said court had delivered its own judgment and did not erred in its decision but would surely move to the Court of Appeal as this General Court Martial is not the final stage.

This is even as the prosecution counsel, Oluremi Ilori, hailed the judgment adding that everybody including the deceased would be happy with the outcome of the case.

Several instructors of Britain’s Army Foundation College were charged with assaulting six teenage recruits at a Scottish military camp, after a three-year investigation.

Aug. 14 (UPI) — Seventeen former British military instructors were charged after a three-year investigation of assaults on recruits, officials said.

The instructors from the Army Foundation College face 40 charges of battery, ill-treatment of subordinates and bodily harm. They are accused of punching and beating six recruits, who were 17 years old at the time, and pushing their heads underwater and smearing animal excrement on them.

The army did not name the instructors, who will be charged in court martial proceedings in September.

All the charged instructors, who are Afghanistan and Iraq combat veterans, deny wrongdoing.

The alleged incidents occurred when the instructors accompanied about 200 recruits on battle maneuvers at a military camp in Kirkcudbright, Scotland.

The Army Foundation College was the subject of a 2016 British television documentary, which was produced after defense chiefs agreed it could help the 4,000-person shortfall in recruits.

“We can confirm that 17 former recruit instructors are to face court martial proceedings at Bulford Court Martial Center on September 21 and 22. These cases are subject to judicial consideration therefore it would not be appropriate to comment further,” a defense ministry spokesman said.

 

A former Marine Corps senior drill instructor has been convicted of multiple charges for abusing his power over recruits at Parris Island, the first guilty verdict handed down in a general court-martial in connection with a hazing scandal that erupted after a Muslim recruit killed himself at the depot last year.

 

Staff Sgt. Antonio Burke was found guilty of failing to adhere to recruit training rules in ways that risked recruits’ welfare, lying to an investigative officer, having a recruit complete his college homework, and propositioning the sister of another recruit, among other charges, Military.com reports. Burke, who was tried by a jury of enlisted Marines and officers, is expected to be sentenced on August 11.

Burke was one of six drill instructors charged for their roles in two separate incidents that allegedly occurred while they were serving with the 3rd Recruit Training Battalion at Parris Island. One involved Raheel Siddiqui, a 20-year-old Muslim recruit, being thrown into an ind

ustrial dryer. Siddiqui jumped to his death from a third-story barracks building on March 18, 2016, minutes after one of the drill instructors reportedly slapped

him.

The other incident involved hazing in an abandoned squad bay known as “the Dungeon,” where Burke and his colleagues allegedly forced recruits to perform draconian training rituals, including “slathering them in sunblock and making them roll around in a sand pit for the purpose of irritating their skin,” according to Military.com.

Burke was not found guilty for his role in the Dungeon incident. He was also acquitted on a number of other serio

us charges, including being drunk on duty and attempting to bribe recruits with Clif bars to silence them as the hazing investigation got underway. According to Military.com, prosecutors struggled to prove certain allegations leveled at Burke because former recruits of his unit, Platoon 3044, gave confusing and sometimes contradictory testimony during the trial.

Among those who testified was Lanc

e Cpl. Kelvin Cabrera, who claimed he was forced to act as a matchmaker between his two sisters and Burke after the drill instructor confiscated a photograph of Cabrera’s family. Burke was found guilty of messaging one sister via Cabrera’s Facebook page and of making Cabrera call the other sister so Burke could proposition her with a trip to Miami. The sister who received the phone call, Jennifer Cabr

era, also testified against Burke.

“I believed the Marine Corps was out there to protect us,” she said. “That abuse of authority that was going on with my brother changed my opinion, slightly.”

The jury also found Burke guilty of forcing a recruit to do his homework for American Public University, as well as not taking proper action after one of the recruits in his charge lost consciousness. The recruit was later found to have a heart condition. Burke was also convicted of grabbing another recruit by his collar and pushing him.

As Military.com notes, of the six drill instructors charged in connection to the hazing scandal, Burke appears to be facing the most serious punishment so far. One of his former colleagues, Sgt. Riley Gress, was acquitted of all charges in May, while two others were spared jail sentences and received administrative punishment instead. Two more cases are expectedto go to general court-martial this fall.

A former Marine Corps senior drill instructor from Parris Island, South Carolina, was found guilty at court-martial of failing to adhere to recruit training rules in ways that risked recruits’ welfare, having a recruit complete his college homework, and forcing another to call his sister so that he could proposition her.

Staff Sgt. Antonio Burke was, however, found not guilty of forcing recruits to perform incentive training in a dusty, abandoned squad bay known as “the Dungeon,” and of slathering them in sunblock and making them roll around in a sand pit for the purpose of irritating their skin.

Burke is expected to receive a sentence Friday morning in the first of three cases involving alleged drill instructor hazing at Parris Island to be tried at general court-martial.

After a recruit jumped from a third-story barracks building to his death last March, a series of command investigations turned up serious allegations of hazing within 3rd Recruit Training Battalion at the recruit depot.

Fifteen drill instructors were sidelined in the initial probe, and six were ultimately charged in connection with two separate alleged incidents, one involving a Muslim recruit thrown into an industrial dryer, and another involving the Dungeon and a spectrum of unauthorized and demeaning training activity.

Of the four drill instructors accused in the latter incident, Burke faced the most serious charges.

But prosecutors were challenged to prove out elements of alleged hazing when a series of former recruits from Burke’s unit, Platoon 3044, offered confusing and sometimes contradictory testimony.

Regarding the Dungeon, testimony was unclear as to when Burke was present for the incentive training, and how bad the breathing conditions were for the recruits, who allegedly did push-ups, burpees, and other strenuous exercises in the room for five to ten minutes at a time.

A jury of enlisted Marines and officers did, however, find sufficient evidence that Burke abused his power over recruits on multiple occasions.

Marine Lance Cpl. Kelvin Cabrera testified that Burke had confiscated a family picture showing Cabrera’s sister, then forced Cabrera to log onto his Facebook page so Burke could message her. While on the page, Burke saw pictures of another sister, Jennifer, and made Cabrera call her so that Burke could proposition her with a trip to Miami.

Jennifer Cabrera testified that the call made her uncomfortable and worried for her brother.

“I believed the Marine Corps was out there to protect us,” she said. “That abuse of authority that was going on with my brother changed my opinion, slightly.”

The jury found Burke guilty as well of lying to an investigating officer about this activity.

Burke was also found guilty of having a recruit do his homework for American Public University; of not taking the proper actions when a recruit, later found to have a heart condition, passed out on his watch; of conducting unauthorized, or “illegal” incentive training with recruits on various occasions; and, on one occasion of grabbing a recruit by the collar and pushing him out of the chow line.

He was acquitted of other charges including being drunk on duty, calling recruits crass names, and throwing their footlockers, all of which are against regulations. Burke had also been accused of attempting to bribe recruits with Clif bars to keep them from saying anything incriminating about drill instructors being investigated; on that charge, too, he was found not guilty.

Despite the various acquittals, Burke may still stand to face the greatest punishment of any drill instructor so far for his inappropriate activities. To date, three other drill instructors from Platoon 3044 have had cases adjudicated in lesser proceedings.

In May, Sgt. Riley Gress was acquitted of violation of a lawful general order, false official statement, and cruelty and maltreatment.

In June, Staff Sgt. Matthew Bacchus pleaded guilty to charges of violation of a lawful general order and maltreatment at a summary court-martial and received administrative punishment. And the same month, Staff Sgt. Jose Lucena-Martinez took a plea deal, avoiding court-martial altogether and receiving administrative punishment.

Two more cases, involving the recruit allegedly stuffed in the dryer, are expected to go to general court-martial this fall.

The 25th Infantry Division Staff Judge Advocate has provided the following courts-martial.

  • Aug. 4, at a general court-martial convened at Wheeler Army Airfield, Pvt. 1stClass Jose J. Olivieritorres, U.S. Army, was convicted by a military judge, pursuant to his plea, of one specification of wrongful use of marijuana in violation of Article 112a, Uniform Code of Military Justice.

The accused was acquitted by a military panel composed of officer members of one specification attempting to commit a sexual act upon a child who had attained the age of 12 years, but had not attained the age of 16 years in violation of Articles 80, UCMJ.

The members sentenced the accused to be discharged from the service with a bad conduct discharge. A pretrial agreement had no effect on the sentence.

  • May 31, at a GCM convened at WAAF, Spc. Preston J. Gachelin, U.S. Army, was convicted by a military judge, pursuant to his pleas, of one charge, one specification, of failure to obey a lawful order in violation of Art. 92, UCMJ; one charge, five specifications, of assault consummated by a battery in violation of Art. 128, UCMJ; and one charge, one specification, of obstruction of in violation of Art. 134, UCMJ.

The Military Judge sentenced the accused to be reduced to the grade of E-1, to forfeit all pay and allowances, to be confined for 14 months, and to be discharged from the service with a bad conduct discharge.

  • May 25 May, at a GCM convened at WAAF, Spc. Kelvin D. Smothers, U.S. Army, was convicted by a military judge, contrary to his pleas, of two specifications of assault in violation of Art. 128, UCMJ.

The military judge sentenced the accused to be reduced to the grade of E-1, to forfeit all pay and allowances, to be confined for five months, and to be discharged from the service with a bad conduct discharge.

  • May 9, at a GCM convened at WAAF, Spc. Clayton D. Neese, U.S. Army, was convicted by a military judge, pursuant to his pleas, of two specifications of assault consummated by battery, in violation of Art. 128, UCMJ.

The military judge sentenced the accused to be reduced to the grade of E-1, to be confined for eight months, and to be discharged from the service with a bad conduct discharge.

  • May 9, at a GCM convened at WAAF, Pvt. (E2) Lyndon T. Walker, U.S. Army, was convicted by a military judge, pursuant to his plea, of one specification of possession of child pornography, in violation of Art. 134, UCMJ.

The military judge sentenced the accused to be reduced to the grade of E-1, to be confined for 13 months, and to be discharged from the service with a bad conduct discharge.

  • May 3, at a GCM convened at WAAF, SPC. Rohan H. Green, U.S. Army, was convicted by a military judge, pursuant to his pleas, of one specification of attempted escape from the custody of the Criminal Investigation Division, or CID, in violation of Art. 80, UCMJ; one specification of damage to government property, in violation of Art. 108, UCMJ; and two specifications of distribution of a controlled substance, in violation of Art. 112a, UCMJ.

Contrary to his plea, the accused was convicted by a panel of officers and enlisted members of one specification of rape, in violation of Art. 120, UCMJ.

The panel of officers and enlisted members sentenced the accused to be reduced to the grade of E-1, to forfeit all pay and allowances, to be confined for 10 years, and to be discharged from the service with a dishonorable discharge.

  • Federal Convictions. In addition to forfeiture of pay (either adjudged or by operation of law), confinement and a punitive discharge, a Soldier will also have a federal conviction that the Soldier must report when filling out a job application. A federal conviction strips a Soldier of many rights, such as the right to purchase and maintain firearms and voting.

WASHINGTON — The Marine Corps has fired two commanders for problems within their units related to the treatment of women as the service continues to investigate dozens of Marines involved in a nude photo-sharing scandal, service leaders said Tuesday.

Two of five Marine Corps commanders removed from duty in 2017 were due to a loss of trust and confidence in their ability to lead their units because of the way their troops behaved toward women, Gen. Glenn Walters, the service’s No. 2 general, told reporters at the Pentagon. He declined to name the commanders who had been dismissed.

“They didn’t have the correct command climate in what they did,” said Walters, the Marines’ assistant commandant. “…If the commander wasn’t behaving right or holding his people accountable, then he was relieved of command. Simple as that.”

It was the first time that the Marine Corps had acknowledged punishing commanders for problems related to the so-called Marines United scandal, in which some male Marines were accused in March of sharing revealing and often explicit photographs of female Marines through a private Facebook group.

In addition to the two fired commanders, two Marines have been involuntarily separated from service, another has been jailed and 30 others have faced some form of reprimand for actions related to the scandal, said Marine Maj. Iain Pedden, leader of the Marine Corps’ military justice branch.

The Naval Criminal Investigative Service has identified 78 active-duty and reservist Marines as persons of interest in a range of activities related to the Marines United scandal, Pedden said Tuesday. To date, 45 cases have been adjudicated, 30 have been sent to commanders for disposition and three others are continuing to be investigated by NCIS.

Most of the Marines who have been punished have avoided a court-martial. Twenty-three received an adverse administrative action, typically a letter of reprimand in their official record, and seven have received some form of non-judicial punishment, which can include a reduction in rank or temporary dock in pay, Pedden said.

The single Marine who has faced a court-martial on charges of sharing explicit photographs was sentenced in July to 10 days confinement, a demotion of three ranks and forfeiture of two-thirds of his pay for one month, the Marine Corps said. The male, enlisted Marine was not identified.

 

VICENZA, Italy — A sergeant charged in connection with the free-fall destruction last year of three Humvees is headed to court-martial, the military said.

Brig. Gen. Tony Aguto, commander of the 7th Army Training Command, has decided to court-martial Sgt. John Skipper, 27, on charges of destroying government property and making a false official statement.

Skipper is assigned to the 1st Squadron, 91st Cavalry Regiment in Grafenwoehr, Germany. The squadron is part of the 173rd Airborne Brigade, based in Vicenza.

Skipper was charged in May. No arraignment date has been set, the 7th ATC said.

Three Humvees broke loose from their parachutes and plummeted to earth during exercise Saber Junction at the Hohenfels Training Area in Bavaria in April 2016.

Authorities have declined to say whether the charges fault Skipper with either an intentional or a negligent action.

Damage, destruction or loss of government property — either “willfully caused” or due to negligence — is an offense under Article 108 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Willful destruction carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison, a dishonorable discharge and forfeiture of all pay and allowances.

Negligent destruction carries a maximum punishment of a year in prison, a bad-conduct discharge and forfeiture of all pay and allowances.

A sergeant first class heard laughing and cursing on a video of the Humvees falling from the sky has already been punished. The sergeant, an “observer trainer coach” assigned to the 7th ATC’s Joint Multinational Readiness Center, was given an administrative letter of reprimand.

“The reprimand addressed the unprofessional comments the soldier made during the video, and the fact that he shared the video with others, which resulted in it being posted to social media by an unknown individual,” said Christian Marquardt, a 7th ATC spokesman.

video of the incident has been viewed more than a million times on YouTube.

The military trial for a former Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island drill instructor linked to the death of a recruit has been rescheduled, according to officials.

Gunnery Sgt. Joseph Felix’s general court-martial was originally scheduled to begin as early as next week; now, it won’t start until the end of October because a judge granted a continuance, according to Marine Corps Training and Education Command, the division that’s handling the proceedings.

The new trial dates: Oct. 30 through Nov. 10.

“The case was continued due to the large number of witnesses and necessary time required to adequately prepare for trial,” Navy Lt. Clay Bridges wrote Friday morning in an email to The Island Packet and Beaufort Gazette. Bridges, assistant senior defense counsel for Defense Service Office’s southeast region, is one of Felix’s attorneys.

The continuance was granted sometime in the past couple of weeks, according to TECOM.

Felix was arraigned April 26 and faces charges ranging from cruelty and maltreatment to obstruction of justice. He will be tried by general court-martial — the highest-level military court — at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C.

A Marine Corps investigation linked Felix to the death of Raheel Siddiqui, a 20-year-old Muslim-American recruit of Pakistani descent who died after a three-story fall at the depot in March 2016.

Shortly before the fall, according to that investigation, Felix allegedly made a reportedly ill Siddiqui perform a series of punitive sprints in the barracks. Siddiqui fell to the floor during the sprints. He then allegedly slapped Siddiqui, who was nonresponsive, in the face. Moments later, Siddiqui ran out the back of the barracks and reportedly jumped from the third-floor stairwell.

The Marine Corps stands by a report that concluded Siddiqui’s death a suicide. The Siddiqui family, of Taylor, Mich., and their attorney, Shiraz Khan, dispute that conclusion.

The same drill instructor reportedly called Siddiqui a “terrorist” at some point during the 11 days the recruit spent on the island. And that instructor should not have been supervising trainees at the time, the Corps said, since he was under investigation for his alleged involvement in a separate incident with a different Muslim recruit, who was ordered into a commercial clothes dryer and questioned about his faith and loyalty.

Sgt. Michael K. Eldridge, another former Parris Island drill instructor, has also been linked to the dryer incident.

He is charged with violations of military law ranging from drunk and disorderly to cruelty and maltreatment, and his general court-martial is on schedule for Sept. 25 to Oct. 6 at Camp Lejeune.

 

 

 

 

A case of sexual offenses was registered at Karwar in Karnataka against the two men who were arrested in July in 2015. They have also been dismissed from service and their identities have not been revealed.

Two sailors have been convicted by a Navy Court Martial of raping and blackmailing a minor girl and sentenced them to 12 and 15 years of rigorous imprisonment.

A case of sexual offences was registered at Karwar in Karnataka against the two men who were arrested in July 2015. They have also been dismissed from service and their identities have not been revealed.

“A case of alleged sexual offence by two naval sailors against a minor girl had been reported. The case was investigated in detail and a court martial was constituted.

“The court martial has found both sailors guilty and sentenced them to rigorous imprisonment for 12 years and 15 years, respectively, and dismissed them from naval service,” a defence spokesperson said on Wednesday. Besides relevant sections of IPC, the duo was also tried under the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act, 2012.

“The naval trial ensured safeguards,including protection of the identity of the victim as per POCSO Act of 2012. Further, in accordance with the provisions of the Act, other details of the case are not being disclosed,” the spokesperson said.

The two navy personnel and a defence employee were arrested on charges of repeatedly raping and blackmailing a minor girl, police said.

According to the police, the victim was in a relationship with one of the accused. In 2014, they parted ways and the girl got engaged to another person. “However, the accused started blackmailing her and demanded sexual favours from her. They threatened that if she does not agree to their demands, they would inform her fiance (about her past relationship). Following the threats, the girl succumbed to their demands,” they said.

They repeatedly raped her since January 2015.

 

Mumbai: A case of alleged sexual offense by two naval sailors against minor girls has surfaced bring a bad name to the Navy. The incident which happened a few months ago and was investigated in detail by the Navy with a court martial against the accused officers.

“The court martial has found both sailors guilty and sentenced them to rigorous imprisonment for 15 years and 12 years respectively and dismissed with disgrace from naval service,” reads a defense press release. The naval trial ensured safeguards including protection of identity of victims as per Protection of Children from Sexual Offenses (POCSO) Act of 2012. Further, in accordance with the provisions of the Act, other details of the case are not being disclosed, it added.